Category: Tiki Month 2014
Mixology Monday, Rule 2, Tiki Month 2014

Tiki Month Roundup 2014


Click through to YouTube for HD video.
Well, another Tiki Month is (mostly) in the books. I'm leaving the decor up here on the website for a few more days, just as I'm leaving the decor up in my basement a bit longer. I still have a number of people who need to see it and visit, but who got snowed out earlier in the month. I feel like I'm getting the hang of Tiki more and more each year, and this year was the first that I had to do little or no basic research to get the results I wanted. I know the history of the movement, and it's current state. I know the attire, the music, the lingo. And I know the drinks. My experiments this year have been exploring some holes in the repertoire, trying a few creations on my own, and formalizing the decorations of my own facility. Next year, I expect to delve a bit deeper into Tiki food. It is the one area I've not been able to crack into fully. Herewith, a roundup of my posts for Tiki Month, 2014. I was less prolific this year than last, but I hope a bit more on point. I'll start with my biggest achievement of the year, my man-sized, light and smoke effects-enabled volcano—a middle school science project gone mad. It is portable, so I can store it for next year, and on into the future. It produced one of those wonderful moments when the PeguWife is forced to admit that strangers actually do read this blog, when someone I'd never met exclaimed to me, "Oh! You're the dude with the volcano!" Completed paper mache volcano I also showed you some video posts on Tiki bombshells of one sort and another.... White-Rum-Has-A-New-Captain Chrissy Teigen Mixology Monday brought me a whole bunch of posts to link to which discussed the theme of Sours in a Tiki or Tikiesque context. MxMo-Tiki-Logo Of course, I posted a whole bunch of drinks individually as well, listed here with pictures. I also came up with two new cocktails, both well-received, and both riffs/tweaks of classics.
Margarita Atoll-A Tiki Margarita Margarita Atoll The Regal Daiquiri, a Tiki drink for MxMmo: Sours And my own MxMo entry: Regal Daiquiri
There were also things I did not get to in the time the calendar grants. I did not review Jeff "Beachbum" Berry's new book in full, largely because Real Life™ has precluding my finishing it. This should not preclude you from buying it anyway. What I've read is fun and supportive of my long-held contention that the Bum should be considered a serious, perhaps a leading, American historian, rather than just a huckster of funky dunky drinks. I also wanted to do a separate post on Putney Farms' Hanalei Sour, which is delicious, and different in presentation, but which I didn't get a chance to try until too late in the game to make the end of February. I may yet take the time I've granted in keeping up the decor to post on these this year. If not, I've got all sorts of ammo to kick off the next! Aloha, Y'all! abc
Other Liqueurs, Recipes, Rule 2, Tiki Month 2014

New Tiki Drink: The Tiki Tree Viper by Rated-R Cocktails

Tiki Tree Viper Cocktail from Rated-R Cocktails The Tiki Tree Viper is one of those newly-invented cocktails you get to see all the time when you read cocktail blogs. Usually, they stick in your mind because of a gorgeous picture, or funky name, or maybe an ingredient that you just haven't done much with. Most of the time the drink, should you find the time to make one yourself, ends up being fairly "eh". But sometimes, it ends up being a real find. JFL, of Rated-R Cocktails, invented the TTV, and posted it just days before Tiki Month began. I had been looking for recipes to blog about, and this one was well-timed. It is a riff on the popular Chartreuse Swizzle, as Tiki/Classic Crossover a cocktail as you will find. Here is my recipe for it. The brands are a bit altered from the original, and I make one critical change in amount, all of which I detail below.
TIKI TREE VIPER
  • 1 1/2 oz. Mount Gay Eclipse
  • 1/2 oz. Lemon Hart 151
  • 1/2 oz. Green Chartreuse
  • 1/4 oz. Bols Blue Curaçao
  • 1 oz. fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 oz. orange juice
  • 1/2 oz. orgeat
Combine ingredients with cracked or small ice and shake to combine. Serve in appropriate Tiki vessel and garnish with dry ice and lavish produce.
The biggest change I make is to back the Chartreuse back from three-quarters in JFL's to half an ounce. At the full three-quarters, I think the Chartreuse starts to bully the other ingredients. At a half, you still by God know it is in the drink, but is stays part of the larger ensemble. I think the suggested mint as garnish is also a bit over the top, too. (And I garnish everything with mint in February.) The cocktail doesn't need more competing herbal notes. Tiki Tree Viper by Rated-R Cocktails Finally, a sliver of dry ice in the bottom gives it the appropriate atmospherics. This is a very mysterious, darkest New Guinea kind of Tiki drink. I have also saved it for the homestretch of Tiki Month because it has been so very popular with my friends. Incidentally, they all independently drop the work "Tiki" from the name, just asking for a Tree Viper. When I ask, they mostly say they don't know what a "Tiki Tree" is. The glasses have, with the exception of one guy whose evening was ending and hadn't expected the potency, come back uniformly empty. I use Tiki Month get togethers as an opportunity to use my guests as lab rats for new drinks, and the Tree Viper has had this year's best results in both attracting orders, and in well-received results.abc
Mixology Monday, Rule 2, Tiki Month 2014

A Tiki Month SubRoundup of MxMo: Sours

MxMo-Tiki-Logo For those of you following Tiki Month, but who may have missed this month's Mixology Monday, I want to present a sub-roundup of the entries which are either explicitly or can just be shoehorned into a Tiki concept. With this month's MxMo theme being Sours, the basic form of most Tiki drinks, it was a target-rich environment. Without further ado, here are whole bunch of great looking drinks with a Tiki theme or Tiki elements, most of which I won't have time to try this month, alas. But I'll get to a bunch of them... oh yes, my precious. Blue MargaritaBartending Notes offered a simple Margarita, but the picture came out blue. Tiki Rule 4 says that If it's Blue, it's Tiki True, so here it is. I just posted about this entry separately here. Rhubarb Rum FizzAndrea, this month's taskmistress, ended up with a Rhubarb Rum Fizz. I'm not sure if rhubarb is Tiki-compliant or not, but it looks tasty, she's our host, and I'm glad I'm not as old as she is and can still take two ounces of lemon juice in one night. (Cough, Fog Cutters, Cough!) Sol Volcanique from Rated-R CocktailsJFL of Rated-R Cocktails is about the most prolific Tiki blogger out there currently. He produces all sorts of delicious and gorgeous original cocktails regularly. Read him. For this MxMo, he rolls out the Sol Volcanique, which employs the rarely used tangerine. Sloppy Joe form Nihil UtopiaMy buddy Dagreb takes the opportunity this MxMo to tell the familiar cocktail blogger story of the One Drink That Really Made Me A Cocktailian™. In his case it is the Sloppy Joe. I'm not sure it is really a Tiki drink, but it has rum and citrus and syrup. And I've already gotten into how vermouth can be a Tiki ingredient, so here I shoehorn it in. Eden Sour from DrinksburghMike from Drinksburgh somehow gets away with putting grenadine in a Trader Vic-style Mai Tai without a horde of angry grass-skirted villagers burning down his house. (Though come to think of it, I haven't heard from him in the last day or so....) Anyway, his Eden Sour would not be any more Tiki if you served it with a plane ticket to Tahiti. 008Caipirinhas aren't usually considered Tiki, but I'm not sure why. When we think of Brazil we think of volcanic upthrusts, scary natives, and barely clad women in the sand. It is sort of a giant, continent-sized Bora Bora. Anyway, the Ginger Kumquat Caipirinha that Mike of Grow. Eat. Mix. Drink. offers is sure Tiki enough for me. BalsouricaTwitter god Joel DiPippa quotes some authority as saying "When you have homemade limoncello everything looks like a Sour." His Balsourica is another drink that teeters on the edge of being had in a Tiki bar, but I want to remember to try it, so I'm including it here. 5 Spice Ti' Punch from Stir and StrainElana at Stir and Strain went with a 5 Spice Ti' Punch. She employs the traditional 5 Spice blend through an infused syrup that I think would be useful for all manner of Tiki drinks beyond her intended use. Hanalei Sour from Putney FarmThe folks at Putney Farm worked up something they call a Hanalei Sour. It looks gorgeous, delicious, and Tiki as all get out. And if I can figure out coconut sugar by this evening, it is what I'm making tonight. Polynesian Sour from Shake Strain & SipLastly, we have the Polynesian Sour, from Scott at Shake Strain & Sip. I won't trying this delectable-looking treat since it calls for Hawaii's own spirit, Okolehao. You'll be shocked, shocked to hear it isn't available in Ohio.... Oh, and the picture will show you that there is no better garnish to announce you have a Tiki Sour on your hands than a giant half a lime. There are lots more great Sours on offer in Andrea's roundup, but these are the ones I think belong in the Tiki category. Remember to swing back by Ginhound to check out all the rest!abc
Recipes, Rule 2, Tequila, Tiki Month 2014

National Margarita Day in Tiki Month: The Margarita Atoll

Margarita Atoll-A Tiki Margarita Today is National Margarita Day. Since just about every day is National {Put name of liquor/cocktail/food/something else that hires PR people here} Day, I usually ignore these momentous occasions on the blog. But every once in a while, circumstances come together to demand a post. This is that point in the current while. I have been happily perusing the results of this month's Mixology Monday, hosted at Ginhound. The theme is Sours, and like yours truly, many of the participants chose to set their offerings in the very Sour-friendly arena of Tiki drinks. Another entrant is Bartending Notes' simple and elegant post on the Margarita (the Gospel of Tequila). Despite a kind shout-out to this humble repository, the Margarita Ceccotti presents is a fairly straightforward, if a touch sweet for my preference, version. Not a Tiki drink, really. But then you look at the picture used:
marg It's BLUE.
Two things here:
  1. I don't know how this azure concoction arose from the recipe in the post
  2. Doug's Rule of Tiki #4 is: If it is blue and has citrus in it, but mostly just if it is blue, it is a Tiki drink.
So today's Tiki Month project was to construct a truly Tiki Margarita. The right recipe was pretty easily obtained. I simply used my standard Margarita recipe, substituted Bols Blue Curaçao for half the Cointreau to obtain the wanted color of Tahitian coral shallows, then backed off the tequila slightly and added a whisper of honey syrup for the sweeter, more undefined Tiki flavor profile.
MARGARITA ATOLL
  • 1 1/4 oz. good silver tequila
  • strong 1/2 oz. fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 oz. Cointreau
  • 1/4 oz. Bols Blue Curaçao
  • 1/4 oz honey mix
Combine in shaker with ice and agitate until frigid. Strain into a cocktail coupe rimmed as below.
Since I'm trying to emphasize the Tiki-ness of this drink, I wanted a garnish somewhat beyond a simple lime wedge, even a nicely tattooed one. I also do not like to rim my Margaritas with salt. If you use good tequila, I've always maintained that the salt rim just wipes out the character of the spirit. But others continue to be wrong disagree. So I chose to split the difference by caving on the second problem to solve the first here. I hauled out my black Hawaiian salt (a great origin for a Tiki drink, yes?). You have to crush this further, since the gravel size it usually comes it is to big and heavy to rim with. I just use a muddler on a plate, but if you have a mortar and pestle you are better off. You don't want to powder the salt, just break it down a little so it can stick. Black Hawaiian Salt I then, both to allow an anti-salt guy like me a way to not taste the salt and for garnish purposes, rubbed the outside of the rim with a lime wedge, but only in patches, before rolling the outside of the glass in the crushed black salt. The result is a nifty look, reminiscent of the ring of volcanic islands of a south Pacific Atoll, surrounding the light blue waters of the sunken caldera. Margarita-Atoll-Rim The drink's not half bad either.abc
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