Category: Gin
Funny, Gin, Recipes, Rule 5, Tiki Month 2016

MxMo CVI: Rickey’s Gin Dugout

Rickeys Rum Dugout MxMo-Tiki-ThumbMixology Monday One Hundred and Six! This month's theme is "Spring Break". One of my favorite Twitter follows, Joel DiPippa, is hosting the rodeo this time around at the Southern Ash blog. The reasoning behind Joel's theme this month is similar to my rationale for having Tiki Month in February: We are done with Winter. Even a mild one like this one. (Shut up Washingtonians! You had it coming.) We are invited to present a liquid interpretation of what Spring Break means to us, to hurry along that blessed celebration of the return of Spring. So what does Spring Break mean to me? The classic, Hollywood-approved image of the holiday is of beach parties with people like this. [caption id="attachment_11022" align="aligncenter" width="750"]Sadly, all the ice in her Navy Grog seems to have melted... Sadly, all the ice in her Navy Grog seems to have melted...[/caption] Or these fine beach party goers... [caption id="attachment_11025" align="aligncenter" width="750"]You didn't think I'd get through a Tiki Month without a Rule 5 post, did you? You didn't think I'd get through a Tiki Month without a Rule 5 post, did you?[/caption] One more image of the classic Spring Break, because rule 5 posts at the Pegu Blog always serve up something for everyone: [caption id="attachment_11026" align="aligncenter" width="750"]I apologize to the ladies for that girl who is in the way... I apologize to the ladies for that girl who is in the way...[/caption] Do these images work for me? No. (Well...) By "no" I mean that I grew up on the beach. In the South. Beach vacations in March always seemed a bit silly to me, so I never partook in the whole "Mardi Gras outside Miami" thing. For me, the actual arrival of Spring is more associated with being able to get outside and (try to) hit the tennis ball. [caption id="attachment_11027" align="aligncenter" width="750"]Not pictured: Me Not pictured: Me[/caption] And my tennis drink, the single most refreshing sports beverage there is, is the venerable Gin Rickey. Gin, ice, soda. Done. It quenches thirst, drives away cramps, and softens the memory of that overhead you just butchered (possibly because this is your second Gin Rickey). But this MxMo comes in the middle of Tiki Month, so I've spent quite a bit of time figuring out how to make a Tiki Gin Rickey. (And figure out a good name that wasn't already cruelly plagiarized from me four years before I myself thought of it.) It is harder than it looks. Crossing a Rickey with a Tiki drink is a bit like crossing a peach with an aardvark. There isn't a lot of common ground. Rickey's are simple, clean, and strident. Tiki drinks are complex, indefinable, and melodious. I ended up keeping most of the clean simplicity of the Rickey, added a few classic Tiki background notes, and for judging purposes gave it the most ridiculously over the top presentation I could come up with.
RICKEY'S DUGOUT DELUXE
  • 2 oz. Bombay Sapphire Gin
  • 1/2 oz. fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 oz. homemade falernum
  • 4 oz. Perrier
Cut a whole pineapple in half and very carefully hollow out the fruit. When you accidentally poke a hole in it anyway, discard and repeat with the other half of the pineapple. Fill with small or crushed ice. Build in gin, lime, and falernum. Top with Perrier and stir. Serve on a tray with sides to catch the spill if the pineapple rolls over.
Yes, it's ridiculous. But I couldn't shake the image of playing tennis in an Hawaiian shirt, then casually sipping from a pineapple half on changeovers... [caption id="attachment_11028" align="aligncenter" width="675"]"Man, could I use a Rickey's Rum Dugout right about now!" "Man, could I use a Rickey's Gin Dugout right about now!"[/caption] Now, the thing is, I succeeded beyond my expectations. This drink really kind of works, so I had to go back and do a practical version that you might make as something other than a lark. RRD
RICKEY'S DUGOUT
  • 2 oz. Bombay Sapphire
  • 1/2 oz. fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 oz. falernum
  • 1/4 oz. pulpy fresh pineapple juice
  • 4 oz. Perrrier
Build in an old-fashioned glass with a semi-circle of pineapple and crushed ice.
It's my first MxMo in ages, folks! I'll try to not be such a stranger. abc
Eggs, Gin, Recipes

Buttermilk Maple Gin Flip

Buttermilk Maple Flip I've really come to love egg cocktails lately. And it is not just because they piss off all the right enemies, like the clueless nutrition nazis and the overzealous food safety inspectors. Eggs can do things for a drink that nothing else can really even approximate. The fats in a yolk can provide a rich, unctuous texture on the tongue that is pleasantly... sturdy. Even heavy cream doesn't make the mouth seem as full as a good egg yolk. And whether it was the finest professional molecular mixology I've had across the land, or my own feeble efforts, I have yet to see a foam that matches the frothy protein matrix of a well shaken egg white. Certainly there are fat or foam effects that you can't manage with an egg, but for the basic task of creating sheer cozy decadence in a glass, there is no substitute for the incredible, edible egg. That said, I don't drink a lot of egg cocktails. They double the prep time of a drink, and usually the cleanup time too. And egg drinks are calorie bombs, too. I can't help getting older, but I do make sporadic attempts to stop getting fatter. So while egg drinks are a serious indulgence, they do have the good graces to taste like one too. Now that I've convinced you to drag a few eggs down to your basement bar, what shall we do with them? How about a Flip? Flips are one of those magnificent cocktail multi-tools, like Rickeys, Sours, and Juleps, that are not so much recipes as templates. A Sour is: spirit, citrus, sweet. Juggle the specific ingredients and ratios to your taste. A Flip is: spirit, egg, sweet, and spice. (If you add cream, you technically have a Nog.) You will often these days see the yolk of the egg swapped out for cream. I think this is because cream is a lot easier to employ that egg yolks, and even the hardest-working bartender in the world can get kinda lazy fast when customers start clamoring for eggs. I think this tendency is why I have never been totally satisfied with Flips I've been served in bars, and why I had not really experimented with them at home, because Holy Foghorn Leghorn, is an egg white and yolk Flip a cut above an egg white and cream one.
risky-business-tom-cruise-eggs Kids, that's a convoluted Risky Business reference. It was a movie from back when we thought stories about how the way to get into Princeton was to run a whorehouse out of your parents' home and milk your buddies out of their college funds were logical and reasonable. It was the 80's, you wouldn't understand.
This Flip, lifted from Serious Eats, shows off both the awesome power of the egg, but also the wonderful opportunities for matching specific spirits in multi-tool cocktail categories like Flips.
BUTTERMILK MAPLE GIN FLIP
  • 1 whole egg, separated
  • 1 oz. buttermilk
  • 1/4 oz. maple syrup (1/2 in the original)
  • 2 oz. gin (I used Watershed's Guild Series Chamomile, which you probably can't get.)
  • nutmeg (optional)
Plop the yolk in your shaker with a few ice cubes and shake break it up. Add whites, buttermilk, syrup, and gin with more ice. Shake for up to a minute. Strain into a cocktail coupe. Grate some nutmeg over the top if needed.
I chose this recipe because I was looking to use this delicious, but frankly weird, Guild House Chamomile Flavored Gin I just bought. It is a custom expression for Cameron Mitchell's Guild House restaurant by Columbus's Watershed Distillery. It's defining characteristics are of course the chamomile, but also a distinct nutmeg element. The Guild House is not a delicate gin, but it is bright, and I guessed, correctly, that the sturdy flavors of the buttermilk in this recipe would stand up to this gin in a complimentary fashion. I omitted the nutmeg, which is the traditional spice in a Flip, because the Guild House brought its own to the party. And I halved the maple syrup called for in the original recipe because I think maple is a cocktail bully that will take over any cocktail it is in if you don't keep it under control. The only place to buy the Guild House by the bottle is at the distillery, so if you want to try this variation elsewhere, I'd try something like Bluecoat. Definitely add back in the nutmeg, though. Finally, remember this is a Flip. Do whatever the hell you want with it. It's a template. Drop the gin entirely and use a rum or rye. I think I'll actually try some tequila next. I'll swap the maple for agave syrup, and drop the buttermilk. I doubt nutmeg will work, though. Any suggestions for a spice? abc
Bartenders, Board of Tiki Idols, Brandy, Gin, Other Liqueurs, Rule 4, Tiki Month 2015

TIki Drink: Tiki Tylenol

Banner TikiTylenol Full This cocktail comes by way of Board of Tiki Idols member, Doctor Bamboo. His name for it in its original form is the Pololu. You can find it in Beach Bum Berry's Remixed, since the good Doctor never seems to have blogged it. I changed its name to Tiki Tylenol, because I make some tiny changes in the recipe, and because if Tylenol is a painkiller without asprin, and this is a Painkiller without rum.... Also, like regular Tylenol, too many can result in liver damage.
TIKI TYLENOL Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with lots of ice and shake very well to fully emulsify the coconut creme. Strain into a largish cocktail glass and sprinkle surface with powdered cinnamon.

This is a particularly delicious, though non-standard Tiki drink. Gin and Cognac work better together than most people think, and at three ounces, pack quite a punch. My main change is to replace the original St. Germaine with the far more potent Thatcher, and adding a little apricot in place of the pear tones in the St. Germain. This change works well, I think. It also lead to an interesting discussion two nights ago. I put the Tylenol on the menu for a bunch of bartenders. An hour and a half in, I observed loudly that I hadn't served a single one of these drinks all night. They all looked at me, and one said simply, "It has St. Germain." I replied that no, it had elderflower, not St. Germain, and what did he have against bartender's ketchup? "Nothing," was the reply. "You put a drink with it on your menu and you'll sell hell out of it to one group of customers, but the others won't touch it for anything." abc
Accessories, Barware, Gin

Christmas Gifts All My Readers Should Ask For

Tanqueray No.10 Imperial Shaker by Jason Crawley It's that time of year again. Time to consider gifts to give to your loved ones, and gifts to ask for from your loved ones. And of course, booze-centric gifts are always in order. The first time I bought booze in my life was a case of wine for my dad, to go with the wine-rack I got him for Christmas. Of course, I was seventeen at the time, but since it was a gift, the guy sold me it anyway. In fact, he suggested it. A different time.... Anyway, via the master-link-baiters at Gizmodo, the crazed maniacs at Needless Markup Neiman Marcus have unleashed their annual Christmas gift guide. As usual, it contains a number of fantasmic gifts in the booze-related vein. Things like a golden top hat champagne bucket, or their hand-blown glass ice bucket with a brass top shaped like an acorn by Oscar de la Renta. There is the Coravin wine vampire thingy that I posted about when it came out. (Due credit to Neiman Marcus, they only want one dollar more than Amazon.) There is even a Burberry dinner jacket in the catalog that I'd give up Bombay Sapphire for.
NM-5ABP_ek I'd give up gin entirely to have his hair....
There is also a Waterford Crystal caviar and vodka chilling set that ought to tempt the most high-end of boozehounds for the bargain-basement price of $3,500 dollars. NM-5K05_mk It ought to be the top tempter, but it is not. And it also really a bargain-basement priced item, compared to the mack daddy of this year's catalog (if you don't count the Maserati or the amphibious jet skis): The Tanqueray No. Ten Imperial Shaker, by Jason Crawley, as pictured atop this post. This gorgeous beast is about 280 pounds of cast iron, brass, and silver. It stands about the height of Gaz Regan, and works four Tanqueray No. Ten-inspired shakers at once, in an up and down motion (no... just, no) and an elliptical motion that is gorgeous. It makes the Waterford set seem inexpensive by ringing up an order of magnitude higher at $35,000, even. They have the good graces not to try the $34,599, "See? It's inexpensive!" trick, though, so kudos again. Crawleys-Imperial-Shaker In addition to the machine, you also get four cases of Tanq Ten, which they are alleging is a year's supply, and a private cocktail education class for you and nineteen of your ginniest friends with Rachel Ford (seen here operating the Imperial Shaker). At any rate, there is s magnificent video from Neiman-Marcus that I can't figure out how to embed, so until I find such a version, you'll have to hit this link to watch it. and here it is:

Tanqueray Imperial Shaker from Pulse-Plus on Vimeo. I want to open up a bar, just to build it around one of these.... That said, it has it's important limitations. Despite being a Tanqueray No. 10-branded device, linked to a gin made for Martinis, you don't shake Martinis. It shouldn't be used for Martinis. More importantly, do not even think about popping a Manhattan into any of those lovely stainless steel shakers. I'll cut you. abc

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