Tag - Rum

1
A Tiki Month SubRoundup of MxMo: Sours
2
Mixology Monday LXXXII: Sours — The Regal Daiquiri
3
New Tiki Drink: Plantation Coffee by Augustine Bar
4
Tiki Drink: Cocoanut Grove

A Tiki Month SubRoundup of MxMo: Sours

MxMo-Tiki-Logo
For those of you following Tiki Month, but who may have missed this month’s Mixology Monday, I want to present a sub-roundup of the entries which are either explicitly or can just be shoehorned into a Tiki concept. With this month’s MxMo theme being Sours, the basic form of most Tiki drinks, it was a target-rich environment.
Without further ado, here are whole bunch of great looking drinks with a Tiki theme or Tiki elements, most of which I won’t have time to try this month, alas. But I’ll get to a bunch of them… oh yes, my precious.

Blue MargaritaBartending Notes offered a simple Margarita, but the picture came out blue. Tiki Rule 4 says that If it’s Blue, it’s Tiki True, so here it is. I just posted about this entry separately here.

Rhubarb Rum FizzAndrea, this month’s taskmistress, ended up with a Rhubarb Rum Fizz. I’m not sure if rhubarb is Tiki-compliant or not, but it looks tasty, she’s our host, and I’m glad I’m not as old as she is and can still take two ounces of lemon juice in one night. (Cough, Fog Cutters, Cough!)

Sol Volcanique from Rated-R CocktailsJFL of Rated-R Cocktails is about the most prolific Tiki blogger out there currently. He produces all sorts of delicious and gorgeous original cocktails regularly. Read him. For this MxMo, he rolls out the Sol Volcanique, which employs the rarely used tangerine.

Sloppy Joe form Nihil UtopiaMy buddy Dagreb takes the opportunity this MxMo to tell the familiar cocktail blogger story of the One Drink That Really Made Me A Cocktailian™. In his case it is the Sloppy Joe. I’m not sure it is really a Tiki drink, but it has rum and citrus and syrup. And I’ve already gotten into how vermouth can be a Tiki ingredient, so here I shoehorn it in.

Eden Sour from DrinksburghMike from Drinksburgh somehow gets away with putting grenadine in a Trader Vic-style Mai Tai without a horde of angry grass-skirted villagers burning down his house. (Though come to think of it, I haven’t heard from him in the last day or so….) Anyway, his Eden Sour would not be any more Tiki if you served it with a plane ticket to Tahiti.

008Caipirinhas aren’t usually considered Tiki, but I’m not sure why. When we think of Brazil we think of volcanic upthrusts, scary natives, and barely clad women in the sand. It is sort of a giant, continent-sized Bora Bora. Anyway, the Ginger Kumquat Caipirinha that Mike of Grow. Eat. Mix. Drink. offers is sure Tiki enough for me.

BalsouricaTwitter god Joel DiPippa quotes some authority as saying “When you have homemade limoncello everything looks like a Sour.” His Balsourica is another drink that teeters on the edge of being had in a Tiki bar, but I want to remember to try it, so I’m including it here.

5 Spice Ti' Punch from Stir and StrainElana at Stir and Strain went with a 5 Spice Ti’ Punch. She employs the traditional 5 Spice blend through an infused syrup that I think would be useful for all manner of Tiki drinks beyond her intended use.

Hanalei Sour from Putney FarmThe folks at Putney Farm worked up something they call a Hanalei Sour. It looks gorgeous, delicious, and Tiki as all get out. And if I can figure out coconut sugar by this evening, it is what I’m making tonight.

Polynesian Sour from Shake Strain & SipLastly, we have the Polynesian Sour, from Scott at Shake Strain & Sip. I won’t trying this delectable-looking treat since it calls for Hawaii’s own spirit, Okolehao. You’ll be shocked, shocked to hear it isn’t available in Ohio…. Oh, and the picture will show you that there is no better garnish to announce you have a Tiki Sour on your hands than a giant half a lime.

There are lots more great Sours on offer in Andrea’s roundup, but these are the ones I think belong in the Tiki category. Remember to swing back by Ginhound to check out all the rest!

Mixology Monday LXXXII: Sours — The Regal Daiquiri

The Regal Daiquiri, a Tiki drink for MxMmo: Sours
It is time for Mixology Monday, the eighty-second edition! This month’s theme, hosted by Andrea at the Ginhound Blog, is Sours. She’s allowing Daisies and Fizzes too, but come on—The Sour is perhaps the single greatest, most versatile class of cocktails to be created to date. If I, whose entire blogging raison d’etre is centered on a certain lone, magnificent, gin Sour, were unable to summon a worthy example and resorted to a Daisy or Fizz, I’d just close the site.

I think we are all obligated to give our take on just what a Sour is, so here is mine: At it’s root, a Sour is a spirit-forward cocktail, enhanced by lesser amounts of citrus juice and sugar. It can be made with almost any class of liquor as the base, though there are specific brands from almost every kind of spirit that lend themselves better or worse to making a Sour. There are multitudinous ways to enhance the basic formula, with alternates for both the citrus as acidifier, and the sugar as a sweetener. Further, Sours are inclusive beasts, that welcome all manner of additional modifiers to the basic three ingredient party. If you are a home bartender, the Sour should be your first and best area of experimentation to begin creating your own original cocktails.

MxMo-Tiki-ThumbTo focus my task further, it is Tiki Month around here, so I had a good road map to use for my sour, and an obvious spirit to base it on: Rum.

Now, if you are making a bedrock rum Sour, and you use lime as your citrus, you have a Daiquiri. I call the Daiquiri the Gospel of Rum because it is the essential rum cocktail. If you have so much as a bottle of Bacardi, you need to know how to make a basic Daiquiri. And then you need to learn how to riff off of it.

I went searching for Tiki Daiquiris, and found a number. One I had not tried was Donn Beach’s Royal Daiquiri. Dating back to the 1950’s, it is a basic Daiquiri, with most of the sugar replaced with parfait d’amour. I don’t have any parfait d’amour, but I do have a bottle of Creme Yvette that I’ve been struggling to find a good use for. I am really motivated to manage this, as one of my best buds in the industry is a brand ambassador for CY. With a simple substitution, here was my first pass:

DON’S ROYAL DAIQUIRI

  • 1/2 oz. fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 oz. Creme Yvette (parfait d’amour in the original)
  • 1/4 tsp. simple syrup
  • 1 1/2 oz. silver rum
  • 4 oz. small ice

Combine in a blender and flash blend for 5+ seconds. Strain through a fine mesh strainer into a cocktail glass.

More on the preparation in a moment. The resulting drink is beautiful and tasty, but a little too sweet for our preferences around this house. It is very accessible, almost too accessible really for my tastes. You could serve this in any mainstream restaurant and the Cosmo drinkers would slug them down like, um, Cosmos. I wanted something a little more Tiki, more complex in flavors. Also, something a little less sweet.

I got rid of the sugar entirely, as the Creme Yvette is plenty sweet. It is also very powerful in flavor. I did not want to reduce the amount, since I loved the color so much, so I cast about for one more exotic multiplier. I settled on OYO Honey Vanilla Vodka, which I’ve had success with in prior Tiki Months. This is, in my opinion, the best product Middle West Spirits produces, and I treat it more as a fine liqueur than an infused vodka. This pops up the proof of the drink, and adds some sweet flavors while actually dropping the overall average sweetness just a hair.

The result is something I’m quite happy with.

REGAL DAIQUIRI

  • 1/2 oz. fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 oz. Creme Yvette
  • 1/2 oz. OYO Honey Vanilla Vodka
  • 1 1/2 oz. silver rum
  • 4 oz. small ice

Combine in a blender and flash blend for 5-7 seconds. Strain through a fine mesh strainer into a cocktail coupe. Garnish with a lime and perhaps a preserved hyacinth flower.

This preparation was new to me, and I like it… a lot. You get the benefits of a blender drink, excellent dilution, chill, and meshing of ingredients, but without the slurry of fine chipped ice that makes the drink loud to sip at first, and quickly diluted thereafter.

I know the OYO is not readily available everywhere (the Creme Yvette for that matter), but it is in distribution to some mail order joints, so look around. It is good stuff.

So there you have it, a simple, easy to make cocktail with a Tiki flair. and one that demonstrated the power and flexibility of the Sour. Enjoy.

New Tiki Drink: Plantation Coffee by Augustine Bar

Plantation Coffee from Augustine Bar
The Plantation Coffee is an original Tiki drink from a new young blogger named Matthew, an engineering student and bartender in Germany. Augustine-Bar has some things in common with other continental cocktail blogs: The English grammar is better than many American counterparts (says the reigning World Comma Splice Champion); He has an annoying tendency to use spirits such as Cuban rum or Giffard coffee liqueur that I can’t get here; And his blog is rife with Metric System quantities. But because Matthew is an engineer, he has had it drilled into him that there is no partial credit for unit conversion mistakes (isn’t that right, NASA?), so he has taken the unusual and very valuable extra step of adding a button to instantly convert his recipes back and forth from metric to imperial. He also throws out an appropriate song to listen to while enjoying his drinks. His blog has some great promise, and of course, I love him because he has embraced Tiki Month wholeheartedly.

Plantation Coffee uses pineapple juice and coffee liqueur, among other things, to modify the rums. It is not really to my taste (I make coffee, I don’t drink it), but the PeguWife has enjoyed very much the several I have made for her. I’ve modified the recipe I show below to account for what I have on hand, so be sure to click thru to Matthew’s site to see his original, and play with the cool “cl oz” buttons.

PLANTATION COFFEE

  • 1 overflowing oz. silver rum
  • 1 overflowing oz. good aged Jamaican rum
  • scant 1/2 oz. good coffee liqueur
  • 1 oz. lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 oz. fresh pineapple juice
  • scant 1/2 oz. simple syrup
  • 1 dash Fee’s cranberry bitters
  • 1 dash Fee’s peach bitters

Shake well with ice, strain into mid-sized vessel with fresh ice. Garnish with an enhanced cherry.

I should explain/apologize for the bitters here. Matthew calls for Berlin Capital bitters, which I don’t have, or Fee’s plum, which I have but cannot find anywhere, damn its eyes.

The finished drink has great color, fits happily in most of my smaller Tiki mugs, and lets you taste the rum without feeling strong. It’s a good drink, and a fine modern Tiki example.

Tiki Drink: Cocoanut Grove

Cocoanut Grove
The Cocoanut Grove is a recipe I’ve had for years now, but never made until last night. Frankly, it looks just a bit boring when you peruse the ingredients, especially the coconut. We in the post-Piña Colada era are trained to see coconut in a cocktail and think bland and thick. But I decided to try it for a couple of reasons. First, I’ve really come to enjoy the whole blender drink in a cocktail glass subset of Tiki libations. They look (and photograph) great. And they seem to often be on the lighter alcohol content side, which I have learned from past Tiki Months is a handy set of cocktails to have in the tool belt when you voyage in the land of Zombies, Jet Pilots, and Scorpion Bowls.

COCOANUT GROVE

  • 1 part light rum (Mount Gay Eclipse Silver for me)
  • 1/2 part fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 part Cointreau
  • 1/4 part coconut creme
  • 4 parts small ice

Combine in a blender, with one ounce for each drink equaling one part. Blend until roughly smooth. Serve in a cocktail glass and garnish appropriately.

The rum isn’t the star of the show here, but use a nice middle-brow one here. You won’t taste the premium in an expensive rum, but you would sense the lame in a cheap one. The coconut creme is only a quarter part, but you still get a strong sense of it. The clear flavor is an indication of how easy it is for this ingredient to overwhelm a drink, and what a shame it is that so many recipes let it. As with any good Tiki drink, flavors not readily apparent in any individual ingredient show up in the finished cocktail. Here the surprise guest is just a hint of chocolate.

The weird spelling of the name Cocoanut Grove comes from the venue of its invention, the Cocoanut Grove club in the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles.

cocoanut grove nightclub
Source: Chexydecimal

The palm tree exotic decor was actually put in place pre-Tiki. They were set pieces from Rudolph Valentino’s The Sheik. I’m betting they sold a ton of Blood and Sands there, back in the day, but it is pretty clear how it would have become a joint that produces interesting Tiki drinks once the movement arrived. The kitchens there were where RFK was shot.

I adopted the recipe from Beachbum Berry’s Intoxica!, which doesn’t have a picture of the drink itself, unless you count the ones being held by a pair of rather smashing looking patrons….

Copyright © 2014. Douglas A. Winship. Powered by WordPress.