Category: Rum
Recipes
Rum
Tiki Month 2014

Tiki Drink: Cocoanut Grove

Cocoanut Grove The Cocoanut Grove is a recipe I've had for years now, but never made until last night. Frankly, it looks just a bit boring when you peruse the ingredients, especially the coconut. We in the post-Piña Colada era are trained to see coconut in a cocktail and think bland and thick. But I decided to try it for a couple of reasons. First, I've really come to enjoy the whole blender drink in a cocktail glass subset of Tiki libations. They look (and photograph) great. And they seem to often be on the lighter alcohol content side, which I have learned from past Tiki Months is a handy set of cocktails to have in the tool belt when you voyage in the land of Zombies, Jet Pilots, and Scorpion Bowls.
COCOANUT GROVE
  • 1 part light rum (Mount Gay Eclipse Silver for me)
  • 1/2 part fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 part Cointreau
  • 1/4 part coconut creme
  • 4 parts small ice
Combine in a blender, with one ounce for each drink equaling one part. Blend until roughly smooth. Serve in a cocktail glass and garnish appropriately.
The rum isn't the star of the show here, but use a nice middle-brow one here. You won't taste the premium in an expensive rum, but you would sense the lame in a cheap one. The coconut creme is only a quarter part, but you still get a strong sense of it. The clear flavor is an indication of how easy it is for this ingredient to overwhelm a drink, and what a shame it is that so many recipes let it. As with any good Tiki drink, flavors not readily apparent in any individual ingredient show up in the finished cocktail. Here the surprise guest is just a hint of chocolate. The weird spelling of the name Cocoanut Grove comes from the venue of its invention, the Cocoanut Grove club in the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles.
cocoanut grove nightclub
Source: Chexydecimal
The palm tree exotic decor was actually put in place pre-Tiki. They were set pieces from Rudolph Valentino's The Sheik. I'm betting they sold a ton of Blood and Sands there, back in the day, but it is pretty clear how it would have become a joint that produces interesting Tiki drinks once the movement arrived. The kitchens there were where RFK was shot. I adopted the recipe from Beachbum Berry's Intoxica!, which doesn't have a picture of the drink itself, unless you count the ones being held by a pair of rather smashing looking patrons.... abc
Funny
Pirates
Rule 5
Rum

It Be Once Again International Talk Like a Pirate Day!

Cocktail Pirate Flag Animated
Pegu Pirate Flag created with ABFlags
Yarrr, Mateys! September 19th be here again, which means it be International Talk Like a Pirate Day™! And I'll be keelhauled fore I be missin' out on the festivities. A blogger's pirate's career be, almost by definition, a spotty one, wi' periods of inactivity due to laziness excessive interest by the British Navy (ptooie!), but I have yet to be missing an ITLAPD, and I'll be hornswoggled if this year be any different! Let's be swingin' into our reel with this fantastical video from Distort. These two swabbies' pirate schtick be a mite lubberly, but it shows promise. Per'aps I should have the crew give 'em the cosh and "invite" them to join our merry band.... What isn't lubberly is the fantastic tiny cannon they've constructed, nor the slo-motion footage they have of it trying to sink a pirate vessel. They could use a bit of help with the editing o' their introduction. Aside from the pirate material, it is a bit long, but don't let that barnacle bottom heave ye off from watching the whole thing. It be worth it! If that only whets yer appetite fer all things cannon this happy day, I'll gift ye two more links. The first be a down in the hold look at how to be makin' such a fine beauty of a brass cannon, though this one be a mite bigger, and with no pirate prattling at all, more's the pity. The second be the construction of a wee bit more Hollywood pirate-looking cannon, that alas doesn't actually fire. The maker does be meritin' big points fer his pirate robot though, arrr! abc
Bartenders
Recipes
Rum
Tiki Month 2013

Tiki Drink: Captain’s Blood

Captain's-Blood-2 Cocktail-style Tiki drinks really have ended up being the central theme of exploration this Tiki Month, and here is another: The Captain's Blood. Of course, both in name and in flavor, the Captain's blood is more Pirate than Polynesian, but I'll allow it. After all, pirate stuff has a long association with Tiki, just as spy-themed music and paraphernalia do. And Tiki's patron saints, Don the Beachcomber and Trader Vic, were really pirates in all but the name. (They also omitted the bad hygiene and most of the old ultra-violence, but let's not quibble) There are all sorts of recipes for Captain's Blood on the web, and aside from all pretty much containing rum, lime of some fashion, and usually bitters of some type, there seems to be no definitive recipe. I suspect that this is one of those drinks with a great name that has been reverse engineered from the memory of the taste countless times, and for which we shall never find a rock-solid origin or original formulation. I went with the one of CocktailDB, which has propagated the farthest on the web and which is the most nearly Tiki in character. I made two amendments, which I will explain.
CAPTAIN'S BLOOD COCKTAIL
  • 1 1/2 oz Jamaican dark rum
  • 1 oz fresh lime juice
  • 2 dashes Angostura Bitters
  • 3/8 oz honey mix
  • 1/4 oz falernum
Shake ingredients and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish nautically.
The original CocktaiDB recipe calls for one dash of Angostura and a half teaspoon of sugar (roughly 1 tsp simple syrup). That result I found to be too thin, even sour, in flavor, especially if you are looking for a Tiki, or at least a Tiki Compliant, cocktail. Increasing the bitters demonstrates that great, largely unappreciated by the masses, cocktail truth: Bitters in small amounts don't increase the bitterness of a drink, they knock the edges off other outsize flavor elements instead. In this case, the extra bitters just sands down the sourness of the lime and falernum without hiding the underlying flavorful goodness. I got the idea for the honey mix from Rumdood's old post on homemade falernum. It was my choice to up the amount. I like the melding of the flavors resulting from the added sweetness, and the honey also gives a tiny bit of additional complexity. But make no mistake, this remains a tart drink. The honey also gives a tiny bit richer body to the cocktail, which I like as well. Next time I try it, I may even replace the honey mix with gomme syrup, to see how far I can take that effect. The suggestion for this Tiki Month post from Jason McGrady, who presides over the mahogany at Sazerac Restaurant in the Hotel Monaco in Seattle, where Maggi and I stayed two Summers ago. What's that? Yes, I keep in touch with bartenders I haven't seen in two years. I keep track of an incredible number of good bartenders around the world whom I seldom actually see. You never know when I am going to have a sudden need for an agent to do me a favor and make me a good drink. I'm like the Shadow that way.
shadow2.psd
"Someday, bartender, I will need a Manhattan from you...."
Source: Alex Sheikman
And hey! This post is part of Tiki Month 2013 here at the Pegu Blog! Be sure to look around for LOTS more Tiki stuff all February!
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